What is ironic about discussing whether or not to include Cicero in the conspiracy? Select two options. Casca firmly reverses his position



What is ironic about discussing whether or not to include
Cicero in the conspiracy? Select two options.
Casca firmly reverses his position about including
Cicero, as if he hadn’t been the one to suggest it in the
first place.
Read the excerpt from act 2, scene 1, of Julius Caesar.
CASCA. Let us not leave him out.
CINNA. No, by no means.
METELLUS. O, let us have him, for his silver hairs
Will purchase us a good opinion,
And buy men’s voices to commend our deeds.
It shall be said his judgment ruled our hands.
Our youths and wildness shall no whit appear,
But all be buried in his gravity.
BRUTUS. O, name him not. Let us not break with him,
For he will never follow anything
That other men begin.
CASSIUS. Then leave him out.
Metellus thinks having gray hair is a sign of weakness
and poor decision-making, but they also have gray
hair.
Casca thinks he is making important decisions when
Brutus is really the one leading the way.
Brutus believes Cicero should included as one of the
conspirators while Cassius disagrees.
CASCA. Indeed he is not fit.
Cassius agrees with Metellus that Cicero, but Casca’s
wise argument sways their opinions.




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