One killed in shooting by Border Patrol agent in Texas

U.S. Border Patrol officials say an agent fatally shot a person driving a vehicle as part of a suspected human smuggling operation

LAREDO, Texas — A U.S. Border Patrol agent investigating suspected human smuggling with other agents in Texas fatally shot a person driving a vehicle carrying people believed to be in the country illegally, federal officials said Saturday.

Border Patrol agents, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and the Webb County constable’s office had stopped a semi in Laredo Friday and found several people inside the trailer, according to a statement from Customs and Border Protection spokesperson Rick Pauza..

Another semi then arrived at the scene, according to a statement, and law officers identified themselves and were approaching the tractor-trailer when the driver began moving in reverse, pinning a Border Patrol agent against another vehicle.

Other agents then opened fire, shooting the driver, who was pronounced dead at the scene. The injured agent was taken to a hospital, where he as treated and released Saturday, according to the statement.

No names have been released.

The shooting is being investigated by Laredo police, the FBI, the border patrol and ICE, the statement said.

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California utility may cut power to 1 million people

SAN FRANCISCO — Northern California officials urged residents to leave homes in the hills, secure backyard furniture and other loose items and have an evacuation plan ready ahead of powerful winds that could lead to widespread electricity outages and leave more than 1 million people in the dark.

Pacific Gas & Electric said it could black out customers starting Sunday in 38 counties to prevent the chance of sparking wildfires as bone-dry, windy weather returns to the region. In the San Francisco Bay Area, customers in every county except for San Francisco could see their power shut off.

The safety shutoffs were expected to begin as early as Sunday morning and last into Tuesday, affecting 466,000 homes and businesses, or more than 1 million residents, assuming between two and three people per home or business customer.

The winds that could potentially be the strongest the region has seen in 20 years could topple trees and power lines or other equipment that in recent years have been blamed for igniting massive and deadly blazes in central and Northern California, officials said.

East of San Francisco, the city of Berkeley recommended residents consider leaving the hills before Sunday afternoon, especially if they would have trouble getting out quickly during a fire.

In neighboring Oakland, at least 10 parks will close Sunday and Monday. Cities throughout the region planned to open emergency operations centers and add additional police officers and firefighters to patrol high-risk areas. Officials were also encouraging people to have their cellphones fully charged or if they have a landline, to connect an old-fashioned phone and not one that depends on electricity.

“I would ask all of the people who live in high-impact areas mimic us and plan ahead of time and do the planning with their neighbors, with their families and within their own households so that if they are asked to evacuate they’re ready and not just then starting to figure it out,” Oakland Assistant Fire Chief Robert Lipp said.

While about one-third of the affected customers will be in the Bay Area, cuts are predicted to encompass parts of the Sacramento Valley, the northern and central Sierra Nevada, the Santa Cruz Mountains, the Central Coast and parts of southern Kern County.

Some of the largest fires this year have occurred since August but California’s most intense fire weather normally comes in the fall. Eight of the 10 deadliest blazes in state history have occurred in October or November.

In November 2018, a blaze ignited by PG&E equipment destroyed much of the town of Paradise in Butte County and killed 85 people. The projected shutoffs included 19,000 customers in parts of that county. A blaze in the Oakland hills in October 1991 killed 25 people.

The National Weather Service issued red flag warnings for many areas, predicting winds of 35 mph (56 kph) or higher in San Francisco and lower elevations and up to 70 mph (113 kph) in mountains. The concern is that any spark could be blown into flames sweeping through tinder-dry brush and forestland.

It said the conditions could equal those during devastating fires in California’s wine country in 2017 and last year’s Kincade Fire. Fire officials said PG&E transmission lines sparked the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County last October, which destroyed hundreds of homes and caused nearly 100,000 people to flee.

“Given that vegetation is now at or near record dryness levels — much as it was prior to the North Bay firestorm in October 2017 — this is a very concerning forecast,” Daniel Swain, climate scientist with UCLA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, wrote in a blog post.

The public safety power shutoff would be the fifth this year, including one that began Wednesday and that ended late Friday.

At Silverado Ace Hardware store in Calistoga, people were buying generators, electrical cords, flashlights, batteries, gas cans and other items, said Kathleen Collins, the store’s assistant manager.

The Napa County town of 5,000 people has been affected by many of the power outages this year. But in the previous outage, the PG&E brought in temporary generators to provide electricity.

“The generators are are still set up out there, so I’m hoping they’re going to keep our power up,” Collins said.

She said losing power is becoming a common occurrence, and people are having to live without electricity for days at time in a region that has been affected by several wildfires in recent years.

“There’s not much we can do about it,” Collins said. “We’ve already been devastated so much by these fires. Being without power seems the only solution right now.”

Southern California, which enjoyed several days of cool temperatures and higher humidity, will see the return of warm, dry Santa Ana winds. A fire weather watch is in effect for much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties from late Sunday through Tuesday. Relative humidity levels will plummet, and winds could top 55 mph in valleys, with gusts of 75 mph possible in mountain areas.

Scientists say climate change has made California much drier, meaning trees and other plants are more flammable.

More 8,600 wildfires have scorched well over 6,400 square miles (16,576 square kilometers) and destroyed about 9,200 buildings in California this year. There have been 31 deaths.

All of the huge fires have been fully or significantly contained, but more than 6,000 firefighters remain committed to 19 blazes, including a dozen major incidents, Cal Fire said.

Many of this year’s devastating fires were started by thousands of dry lightning strikes. But some of the fires remain under investigation for potential electrical causes.

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This story has been corrected to show the utility may, not will, cut power to over 1 million people.

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Vehicle strikes 3 Notre Dame students, killing 2, in Indiana

A vehicle struck three University of Notre Dame students, killing two of them, early Saturday in the northern Indiana city that’s home to the university’s campus

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — A vehicle struck three University of Notre Dame students, killing two of them early Saturday in the northern Indiana city that’s home to the university’s campus, the school’s president said.

South Bend police said the vehicle hit three pedestrians before crashing into a house just after 4 a.m. The driver remained at the scene and was cooperating with investigators, police said.

The Rev. John Jenkins, Notre Dame’s president, said first-year students Valeria Espinel, 19, from Guayaquil, Ecuador, and Olivia Lara Rojas, 19, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, were killed. A sophomore was hospitalized, he said in a news release.

“On behalf of the entire Notre Dame community, I express our deepest condolences and pray that our students’ families and friends may find God’s grace and solace after so shattering a loss,” Jenkins said. “We also pray for a full recovery of our student who remains hospitalized as a result of the accident.”

The intersection where the students were struck does not have sidewalks and the Stadium Club Apartments — home to several Notre Dame upperclassmen and graduate students — is located nearby, the South Bend Tribune reported.

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Student pilot among crew that died in Navy crash in Alabama

The U.S. Navy says the two crew members who died when a Navy training plane out of Florida crashed in an Alabama residential neighborhood were an instructor pilot and a student aviator

FOLEY, Ala. — The two crew members who died when a U.S. Navy training plane out of Florida crashed in an Alabama residential neighborhood were an instructor pilot and a student aviator, the Navy said Saturday.

The two-person crew, whose names were not immediately released, were on a routine training flight Friday out of Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Milton, Florida, Zach Harrell, spokesman for Commander, Naval Air Forces, said.

Navy investigators were at the scene. They were seeking any photos or video of the aircraft in flight, WALA-TV reported.

A photo shows smoke billowing from a home and at least two vehicles in the subdivision in Foley, Alabama on the Gulf Coast where the T-6B Texan II aircraft crashed around 5 p.m. Friday. No one on the ground was injured.

Staff and kids at a nearby school were still on campus in an after-school program, Baldwin County Public Schools Superintendent Eddie Tyler told WALA-TV, calling the crash “a little too close for comfort.”

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2 staff members to Sen. Loeffler test positive for COVID

The office of U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler says two staff members tested positive for the coronavirus, but a subsequent test of the Georgia Republican came back negative

Loeffler was tested on Friday after learning about the positive tests of two Senate staff members, her office said in a brief statement.

The statement did not say whether the senator had close contact with the staff members or planned additional tests. An email to a spokesman was not immediately returned.

“Senator Loeffler is more energized than ever to vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett as the next Supreme Court Justice on Monday before returning home and traveling the state to meet with hardworking Georgians,” the statement said.

Loeffler took office this past January after being appointed by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp to replace retiring GOP Sen. Johnny Isakson.

She is trying to hold on to the seat this November, but faces a tough challenge from fellow Republican Doug Collins, a four-term congressman, and Democrat Raphael Warnock, pastor of the Atlanta church where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. preached.

A Jan. 5 runoff between the race’s top two candidates — likely Warnock and either Loeffler or Collins — will be required if nobody wins more than 50% in November.

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‘All talk, no action’ defense likely in Michigan kidnap case

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — When members of a Michigan paramilitary group were accused a decade ago of scheming to overthrow the U.S. government, their defense was based largely on one claim: We were all talk, no action.

It worked so well that a federal judge took the rare step of dismissing most charges against the extremist group known as Hutaree, without giving the jury a say.

“Saying things like ‘I hate the governor, the governor is tyrannical’ … is not illegal, even if you’re holding a gun and running around the woods when you do it,” Satawa told The Associated Press.

The “big talk” argument likely will be a primary theme for the defense, as attorneys indicated during a preliminary hearing this month. The verdict may turn on whether the judge or jury are convinced the plot was serious, say trial lawyers not involved with the matter.

Yet they caution that unique factors pose challenges and uncertainties for both sides — particularly as the matter unfolds against the backdrop of a pandemic, economic upheaval and a yawning political divide in the U.S.

“The defense lawyers are going to have their work cut out for them finding fair and impartial jurors who haven’t predetermined the outcome before they hear the case,” said Mike Rataj, another member of the defense team for the Hutaree, who were acquitted in 2012.

“On its face it looks terrible,” Rataj said, referring to police and news reports about the kidnap plot allegations.

A crucial difference between the Hutaree case and this one is that the Hutaree extremists were charged with sedition — rebellion against the government. In the alleged plot against Whitmer, six men, led by Adam Fox of the Michigan III%ers, are charged in federal court with conspiracy to kidnap — a more specific allegation.

Authorities say members of a second anti-government organization also participated in the abduction scheme. Eight other men are believed to be members or associates of a group called the Wolverine Watchmen and are charged in state court with counts including providing material support for terrorist acts. Some of the Wolverine Watchmen are accused of planning and training for other violent crimes, including storming the Michigan Capitol building.

To win a conviction on the federal charges, prosecutors must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that more than one person agreed to kidnap the governor and took at least one step toward carrying out the plan.

The preliminary hearing showed the prosecution would use text messages and conversations secretly recorded by informants as evidence. The plotters cased Whitmer’s northern Michigan vacation home in August and September and one purchased a Taser, while others agreed to buy explosives and tactical gear, FBI agent Richard Trask testified.

Defense attorneys grilled Trask about missing details, such as how the kidnapping would be done and where Whitmer would be taken. They questioned whether infiltrators had egged on the defendants. They argued that inflammatory comments and even live-fire training exercises were constitutionally protected.

Magistrate Judge Sally Berens ruled there was enough to send the case to a grand jury, which could issue indictments.

“The government isn’t required to show that the conspirators signed on a dotted line or had a five-step plan for exactly how it was to go,” she said. “They’re required to show unity of purpose.”

But the defense likely will portray the plot as more fantasy than reality, said John Smietanka, a former federal prosecutor.

“The tricky thing about conspiracy cases is … when you have multiple parties, whether they have the same motives and agree on a common plan,” said Smietanka, who also has been a defense lawyer. “What exactly did they agree to, and how?”

Defense attorneys probably also will focus on the informants and raise the idea of entrapment, he said.

A potential wild card is the defendants’ alleged political motivation.

While polls show many Michigan residents support Whitmer’s strict handling of the coronavirus outbreak, she has drawn fierce opposition from some conservatives, including people who rallied at the state Capitol.

The jury pool in a kidnapping trial would be drawn from western Michigan, which leans Republican.

“Some of them may be sympathetic to these guys,” Rataj said. “They may not like the governor. They might be the kind of folks who think she exceeded her power.”

Prosecutors will try to weed out potential jurors who might be biased against Whitmer or the government in general, or skeptical about the pandemic, he said.

Defense attorneys, meanwhile, will be on the lookout for those who might be turned off by anti-government paramilitary activities.

“A federal judge is going to give you a lot of leeway in asking jurors about their sympathies and thinking” in the hope of getting an impartial panel, said Terry Dillon, another former federal prosecutor.

But at a time of bitter partisanship and overheated political rhetoric, he said, a claim that “this was loose talk, I was frustrated, I was just mouthing off, I never in this world intended to do anything” might be enough to raise doubts.

“All you need is one to hang a jury,” Dillon said.

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After 200 years, Virginia to let judges decide sentences

For the first time in more than 200 years, criminal defendants in Virginia will have the option to be sentenced by judges instead of juries

RICHMOND, Va. — Defense attorneys call it “the jury penalty.”

It’s a centuries-old sentencing system in Virginia that calls for juries to decide punishment for criminal defendants, and often leads to stiffer sentences than what judges give or prosecutors offer in plea deals.

This sentencing structure has been in place for 224 years, but under a bill recently approved by the state legislature, Virginia is expected to turn sentencing over to judges, joining the vast majority of states around the country. Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam, a strong supporter of criminal justice reform, is expected to sign the bill into law.

The proposal sparked fierce debate during a special legislative session focused on criminal justice and police reform. Supporters of the change said giving judges the sentencing responsibility will result in fairer sentences, but prosecutors predicted it will result in more jury trials and therefore require additional judges, court clerks and public defenders.

The bill’s sponsor, Democratic Sen. Joe Morrissey from Richmond, said that under the current system, many people charged with crimes in Virginia are so fearful of getting a severe sentence from a jury that they often accept a plea deal from prosecutors that includes a longer sentence than they would typically get from a judge.

Unlike judges, juries in Virginia are not given state sentencing guidelines that would tell them what a typical sentence would be for a particular crime, and they tend to hand out stiffer sentences. In fiscal year 2019, sentences handed down by juries went above sentencing guidelines 37% of the time, and in 2018, juries exceeded sentencing guidelines nearly 50% of the time, according to annual reports by the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission.

“Jurors have no idea what a normal sentence is,” Morrissey said. “That’s why it is important to have a judge sentencing who has the guidelines and can put it into context.”

But prosecutors said turning sentencing over to judges will result in more defendants going to trial instead of accepting a plea deals, adding strain to a judicial system already struggling with a large backload of cases caused by the postponement of jury trials during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Prosecutors believe the state will end up needing more judges, public defenders, court clerks and support staff to handle longer trial dockets.

Jeff Haislip, president of the Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys, said prosecutors are also concerned that the goal of the bill appears to be to get more lenient sentences for defendants.

“In jurisdictions where you have multiple jury trials lined up, if the goal is to get the defendant a better deal, that may not be in the best interests of public safety,” Haislip said.

Republican Sen. Mark Obenshain voted against the legislation, saying sentencing decisions should be left to jurors.

“We are saying we don’t trust the people in our communities to make judgments about the appropriate punishment for criminal behavior. We have entrusted that to our friends and neighbors.” Taking that away, he said, “is the wrong policy choice.”

Only six states — Virginia, Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas — use juries to sentence defendants in non-capital felony cases. The Virginia legislation would turn over sentencing to judges except when a defendant requests sentencing by a jury.

Morrissey said he believes the number of jury trials will not increase significantly because prosecutors — knowing that judges generally give out lighter sentences than juries — will begin to offer reasonable sentences as part of plea deals. He said he believes the change will save the state millions of dollars in the long run because fewer inmates will receive excessive sentences and the average length of incarceration will go down, meaning lower prison costs.

The change would become effective in July 2021. Northam’s spokeswoman, Alena Yarmosky, said Northam is “committed to comprehensive criminal justice reform” and is in the process of reviewing the legislation.

“The lives of Virginians that are affected by this is immeasurable,” said Morrissey. “It’s not just defendants who are sentenced to an excessive sentence. It’s also their families.”

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Judge: Michigan agency can evaluate Great Lakes tunnel plan

A judge says the Michigan Public Service Commission has some authority over Enbridge’s plans to build an oil pipeline tunnel beneath the channel that connects Lake Michigan and Lake Huron

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — The Michigan Public Service Commission has some authority over Enbridge’s plans to build an oil pipeline tunnel beneath the channel that connects two of the Great Lakes, a state administrative law judge ruled Friday.

The agency can evaluate the need for the project and whether it would be designed, constructed and operated safely, Judge Dennis W. Mack said. But the commission should not delve into broader issues such as how the pipeline contributes to climate change, he added.

The split decision suggests the commission, which regulates public utilities such as electric power, telecommunications and natural gas services, might play a pivotal role in determining whether the project goes forward.

Enbridge also needs permits from the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

“We look forward to working with the Michigan Public Service Commission as the PSC gives ample opportunity for all Michiganders to be heard — while preventing the process from being misused to promote issues unrelated to the project,” company spokesman Ryan Duffy said.

Environmental groups fighting the tunnel plan praised the judge’s finding that the commission could weigh the project’s safety but also expressed disappointment that he limited the inquiry.

The Canadian energy transport company operates Line 5, which daily carries about 23 million gallons (87 million liters) of crude oil and natural gas liquids used in propane. It runs between Superior, Wisconsin, and Sarnia, Ontario, crossing parts of northern Michigan.

A more than 4-mile (6.4-kilometer) section divides into two pipes that run along the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac, which links Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

Enbridge noted that it’s in good condition but has proposed running a new section of pipe through a $500 million tunnel that would be drilled beneath the straits.

The public service commission has a say over the company’s plan because it would need to approve relocating Line 5.

Enbridge argued that the commission’s scope was limited to the pipeline itself, not the proposed tunnel, which would be overseen by the Mackinac Straits Corridor Authority, established in 2018.

But in his ruling, Mack concluded that the pipeline and tunnel were “inextricably connected.”

While the commission would not decide whether to approve the tunnel, it would question whether the pipeline relocation would serve a public need, is designed and routed reasonably, and would “satisfy applicable safety and engineering standards,” he noted.

Mack agreed with Enbridge that the commission shouldn’t consider whether the entire 645-mile (1,038-kilometer) pipeline needs to continue operating, as environmental groups and tribes wanted.

It’s appropriate for the commission to consider whether the pipeline relocation would comply with the Michigan Environmental Policy Act, relying on state and federal agency experts, Mack said.

But he said there was no legal basis for making global warming caused by fossil fuels transported through the pipeline a factor in the commission’s decision. Environmentalists said they would appeal that part of his ruling.

“There is no getting around the fact that building a new oil tunnel to operate for up to 99 years would exacerbate climate change,” said Kate Madigan of the Michigan Climate Action Network.

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PG&E to cut power to over 1 million people in California

SAN FRANCISCO — Pacific Gas & Electric may cut power to over 1 million people on Sunday to prevent the chance of sparking wildfires as extreme fire weather returns to the region, the utility announced Friday.

The nation’s largest utility said it could black out customers in 38 counties — including most of the San Francisco Bay Area — as weather forecasts called for a return of bone-dry, gusty weather that carries the threat of downing or fouling power lines or other equipment that in recent years have been blamed for igniting massive and deadly blazes in central and Northern California.

The safety shutoffs were expected to begin as early as Sunday morning and last into Tuesday, affecting 466,000 homes and businesses, or more than 1 million residents assuming between two and three people per home or business customer.

Cuts are predicted to encompass parts of the Sacramento Valley, the northern and central Sierra Nevada, upper elevations of the San Francisco Bay Area, the Santa Cruz Mountains, the Central Coast and portions of southern Kern County.

The shutoffs could include 19,000 customers in parts of Butte County, where a 2018 blaze ignited by PG&E equipment destroyed much of the town of Paradise and killed 85 people.

Forecasts call for the “the driest humidity levels and the strongest winds of the wildfire season thus far,” a PG&E statement said.

The National Weather Service issued red flag warnings for many areas, predicting winds of 35 mph (56 kph) or higher in San Francisco and lower elevations and up to 70 mph (113 kph) in some mountains. The concern is that any spark could be blown into flames sweeping through tinder-dry brush and forestland.

“On a scale of 1 to 10, this event is a 9,” Craig Clements, director of San Jose State University’s Fire Weather Lab, told the Bay Area News Group. “Historically our biggest fires are in October. We are in a critical period.”

The National Weather Service said the conditions could equal those during devastating fires in California’s wind country in 2017 and last year’s Kincade Fire.

Fire officials said PG&E transmission lines sparked that Sonoma County fire last October, which destroyed hundreds of homes and caused nearly 100,000 people to flee.

The public safety power shutoff, or PSPS, would be the fifth this year, including one that began Wednesday and was scheduled to end late Friday.

The upcoming weather forecast will be even more dangerous, said Scott Strenfel, the utility’s chief meteorologist.

“We’re seeing four extremes in the weather for this potential PSPS event: extremely high winds, extremely low humidity, extreme dry fuels due to the hottest average temperatures over the last six months according to records that go back 126 years, and extreme drought across the territory given lack of rainfall,” he said in a statement.

Southern California, meanwhile, continued to cool down with patchy drizzle. Forecasters said light rain was expected Saturday night through early Monday, with light mountain snow possible Sunday night, followed by Santa Ana winds.

Eight of the 10 deadliest fires in California history have occurred in October or November. Some of the largest also have occurred since August of this year.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire, said 5,500 firefighters were working Friday to fully contain 19 wildfires. Two-dozen new fires were contained Thursday despite red flag conditions. Numerous studies have linked bigger wildfires in America to climate change from the burning of coal, oil and gas.

Scientists say climate change has made California much drier, meaning trees and other plants are more flammable.

More 8,600 wildfires have scorched well over 6,400 square miles (16,576 square kilometers) and destroyed about 9,200 buildings in California this year. There have been 31 deaths.

All of the huge fires have been fully or significantly contained, but more than 6,000 firefighters remain committed to 19 blazes, including a dozen major incidents, Cal Fire said.

Many of this year’s devastating fires were started by thousands of dry lightning strikes. But some of the fires remain under investigation for potential electrical causes.

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This story was first published on October 23, 2020. It was updated on October 24, 2020, to correct that Pacific Gas & Electric may, not will, cut power to some 1 million people. With AP Photos.

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Chief: Illinois officer who shot Black couple in car fired

A suburban Chicago police chief says an officer who shot a Black couple inside a vehicle has been fired after committing “multiple policy and procedure violations.”

WAUKEGAN, Ill. — A suburban Chicago police officer who shot a Black couple inside a vehicle — killing a 19-year-old man and wounding his girlfriend — has been fired, the police chief announced late Friday.

The officer who fatally shot Marcellis Stinnette and the wounded Tafara Williams following what authorities have described as a traffic stop late Tuesday committed “multiple policy and procedure violations,” Waukegan Police Chief Wayne Walles said in a brief statement. No other details, including the officer’s name, were provided.

The announcement of the firing came shortly after Lake County’s chief prosecutor announced the FBI will join Illinois State Police in investigating the shooting.

Lake County State’s Attorney Michael Nerheim said he asked the U.S. Justice Department to review the circumstances surrounding the shooting.

“I am confident in the work being done by the Illinois State Police and welcome the assistance of the FBI,” Nerheim said in a statement. ”As I have said before, once the investigation is concluded, all the evidence will be reviewed and a final decision will be made with respect to any potential charges.”

Waukegan police have said Williams was driving and Stinnette was a passenger in a vehicle that fled a traffic stop late Tuesday and that the vehicle was later spotted by another officer. Police said that as the second officer approached, the vehicle started moving in reverse and the officer opened fire. No weapon was found in the vehicle.

The officer who shot the couple is Hispanic and had been with the Waukegan Police Department for five years. The officer who conducted the original traffic stop is white, police said.

During a Thursday demonstration, Clyde McLemore, head of the Lake County chapter of Black Lives Matter, called for a federal investigation. Activists and relatives of the couple also have demanded the release of police video of the shooting, which authorities say has been turned over to investigators.

Activist Chris Blanks said the video is particularly important because the police version of events and the version Clifftina Johnson said her wounded daughter, Williams, shared with her appear to contradict each other. Johnson said her daughter told her that Williams and her boyfriend had done nothing to provoke the officer.

Nerheim urged calm while the investigation takes place and pledged transparency.

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